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Research & Insights

“Progress belongs to the Askers; the smarter the question, the lesser the guessing.”― Aniekee Tochukwu Ezekiel

Asking smart and tough questions until we get answers that work is what we do. We know that diversity, inclusion, leadership, unconscious bias, cognitive differences, multiple intelligences, emotional intelligence, and other such human dynamics are complex and constantly changing. We apply the Nextions Next QuestionNext ConnectionNext Action model to design interdisciplinary studies to break down the complexities so that we can help you think smarter and lead better in your workplace.

See our latest research below or search for specific topics.

Books & Book Chapters

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Research Studies, Articles & Essays

 

Manterruptions, Bropropriation and Mansplaining: Gender Bias and the Pervasive Interruption of Women

Women have been talking for decades about the realities of consistently being interrupted by men when they speak in the workplace; however, the focus on men interrupting women at work has recently intensified to a point where new vocabulary is deliberately sarcastic, not to disrespect or demean, but to highlight the frustration that the interruptive behavior continues to engender.

Creative Maladjustment in a Changing World

As we celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. King, the world often turns to the iconic and inspiring words of Dr. Kinds “I Have A Dream” speech. Yes, this historical speech delivered to hundreds of thousands of people at the March on Washington on August 28, 1963, was a game-changing call to action for a nation in crisis. For me, the lesser-known speech that he delivered to a small crowd at Western Michigan University just a few months later on December 16, 1963, holds the words that most profoundly impact how leaders need to think and lead today.

Name-Calling: Confrontation Fails to Bring Dialogue and Resolution

There is no doubt that adjectives are seen by many as having merely supporting roles in language constructions where nouns are the lead players. However, when it comes to active inclusion, changing particular nouns into adjectives can allow for a change in the way that those nouns, as nouns, just cannot do. This is especially true when we deal with the -ists in our vocabulary when discussing differences.

Written in Black and White: Exploring Confirmation Bias in Racialized Perceptions of Writing Skills

Given our finding in a previous study that supervising lawyers are more likely than not to perceive African American lawyers as having subpar writing skills in comparison to their Caucasian counterparts, we asked if confirmation bias unconsciously causes supervising lawyers to more negatively evaluate legal writing by an African American lawyer.

Another Take on Diversity: The Problem with an All-Female Jury

Exclusion by process (women not being asked to serve on juries even though they were eligible) was deemed to be as detrimental as exclusion by legislation (laws excluding women from being eligible to serve). The court went so far as to say: “It is said, however, that an all-male panel drawn from the various groups within a community will be as truly representative as if women were included.

Think Smarter. Lead Better.

  • I not only use all the brains that I have, but all I can borrow.

    Woodrow Wilson
  • When we're talking about diversity, it's not a box to check. It is a reality that should be deeply felt and held and valued by all of us.

    Ava DuVernay
  • It is time for parents to teach young people early on that in diversity there is beauty and there is strength.

    Maya Angelou
  • I had the pleasure of working with Dr. Reeves in her positions on two different ABA presidential-appointed committees. She quickly earned a reputation as a strategic thinker, insightful leader and reliable worker who produced desired results. I give her the highest recommendation for any project she undertakes.

    Cie Armstead Director, American Bar Association – Diversity Center
  • The biggest mistake is believing there is one right way to listen, to talk, to have a conversation -- or a relationship.

    Deborah Tannen